Define Deliverables and Objectives

DEFINE DELIVERABLES AND OBJECTIVES

If you accept the idea that the foundation of good partnerships is spreadsheet results, you’ll understand why the next step is to define deliverables and objectives, such as:

Additional revenues

Reduced costs

New products

New customers

New geographic markets

New support programs

Training and marketing programs

There are two reasons few companies define deliverables and objectives: First, the partnership is built on hype, so it’s challenging to develop concrete deliverables and objectives. This is not a good sign.

Second, and less depressing, people don’t have the discipline to establish deliverables and objectives because they are too busy, disorganized, or lazy—or they are afraid of measuring results.

Here is a checklist of areas that the members of a partnership should define:

What will each organization deliver?

When will they deliver it?

What interim milestones must each organization meet?

You’ll find that by basing a partnership on spreadsheet numbers and defining deliverables and objectives, you’ll triple the probability of success.

Additional revenues

Ensure That the Middles and Bottoms Like the Deal

A second fundamental flaw of the Apple-Digital partnership was that the middle- and bottom-level employees (that is, where the real work was done) of both organizations didn’t believe in it.

“The best partnerships often begin when the middles and bottoms of organizations started working together before any executives got involved.”

If you want to make a partnership work, don’t focus on drafting a press release and getting CEOs to show up at a press conference. Ensure, instead, that the middles and bottoms understand the reasons for the partnership, want to make it work, and value each other’s contributions.

An announcement, if any, should come after the partnership is working well. Indeed, the best leagues often begin when the middle and bottom of organizations started working together before any executives got involved.

If you want to make a partnership work, don’t focus on drafting a press release and getting CEOs to show up at a press conference. Ensure, instead, that the middles and bottoms understand the reasons for the partnership, want to make it work, and value each other’s contributions.

An announcement, if any, should come after the partnership is working well. Indeed, the best leagues often begin when the middle and bottom of organizations started working together before any executives got involved.

Reduced costs

Find Internal Champions

Partnerships need internal champions to make them work. CEOs are seldom influential in this role because most of them are too busy or are both attention deficits. Internal champions should ideally be a person or a small group who believes in the relationship and will live or die by it.

Many people have heard of the former CEO of Apple. Fewer people have heard of John Scull, the desktop-publishing champion inside Apple, who in 1985 was the point person for Apple’s efforts in this nascent market.

Besides marketing your business, you might also want to promote your business and upgrade your business model. Well, you can do this easily with the help of HyperEffectsHyperEffects provides you an uncomplicated way of upgrading your business model through various digital services such as providing an official website for your business, providing a mobile-friendly application, Business plans, and business marketing, etc.

So do checkout HyperEffects today

0/5 (0 Reviews)
0/5 (0 Reviews)
0/5 (0 Reviews)
Scroll to Top